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From endometriosis to pregnancy: which is the “road-map”?

Abstract

In the last decade, pregnancy was considered as a therapeutic period for patients affected by endometriosis and painful symptoms. However, several studies have taken into consideration how endometriosis affects pregnancy achievement and pregnancy development, including obstetric complications. The adverse effects of endometriosis on the development of pregnancy include miscarriage, hypertensive disorders and pre-eclampsia, placenta previa, obstetric hemorrhages, preterm birth, small for gestational age, and adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this review is to analyze the current literature regarding the relationship between different forms of endometriosis (endometrioma, peritoneal endometriosis, deep endometriosis) and infertility, and the impact of endometriosis on pregnancy outcomes.

Post author correction

Article Type: REVIEW

Article Subject: Pain

DOI:10.5301/jeppd.5000307

Authors

Errico Zupi, Giovanna De Felice, Francesca Conway, Francesco Martire, Caterina Exacoustos, Gabriele Centini, Lodovico Patrizi, Emilio Piccione, Lucia Lazzeri

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: No grants or funding have been received for this study.
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has financial interest related to this study to disclose.

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Authors

Affiliations

  • Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Obstetrics and Gynecological Clinic, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Rome - Italy
  • Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecological Clinic, University of Siena, Siena - Italy

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